Frequently Asked Questions

Why Do We Pronounce it 'Quin-zee'?

Assessments: How are values determined?

Who was John Quincy Adams?


Why Do We Pronounce it 'Quin-zee'?

Why do we pronounce Quincy 'Quin-zee' when just about everyone else in the country refers to it as 'Quin-see'? There are 19 other Quincys in the U.S. but they pronounce it 'Quin-see'. Can they be right and we be wrong?

Not according to Quincy's late city historian, William C. Edwards who never budged an inch whenever the argument ever came up. And it still comes up.

The reason we pronounce it 'Quin-zee' is very simple.

The original Quincy family which settled here at Mount Wollaston pronounced it 'Quin-zee', including Col. John Quincy after whom Quincy, Mass. - the first Quincy - was named in 1792.

Colonel Quincy was the great grandfather of sixth President John Quincy Adams.

Apparently, all 19 other Quincys in the U.S. were named after John Quincy Adams. And, apparently the early settlers of those communities thought John Quincy pronounced it John 'Quin-see'.

Anyway, that is how Edwards explained it. Seems like a sound argument.

Reprint from the Quincy Sun, 'Historic Quincy' Supplement, June 27, 1996

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Assessments: How are values determined?

The Assesssor determine the market value of every parcel of property in a city or town as of each January 1. There are three approaches to value: market, income and cost.

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Who was John Quincy Adams?

John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was an American diplomat and politician who served as the sixth President of the United States from March 4, 1825 to March 4, 1829. He was a member of the Federalist, Democratic-Republican, National Republican, and later Anti-Masonic and Whig parties.

Adams was the son of the second President John Adams and his wife Abigail Adams, the name "Quincy" having come from Abigail's maternal grandfather, Colonel John Quincy, after whom Quincy, Massachusetts is also named.[1] He was a diplomat, involved in many international negotiations, and helped formulate the Monroe Doctrine as Secretary of State. As president he proposed a program of modernization and educational advancement, but was stymied by Congress. Adams lost his 1828 bid for re-election to Andrew Jackson.

Adams was elected a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts after leaving office, the only president ever to do so, serving for the last 17 years of his life. In the House he became a leading opponent of the Slave Power and argued that if a civil war ever broke out the president could abolish slavery by using his war powers, which Abraham Lincoln partially did during the American Civil War in the 1863 Emancipation Proclamation.

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